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to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
. all of this is happening and secretary of state clinton has gone to egypt and the west bank helped broker a cease-fire deal. joining us now is michael oren who is is really ambassador to the united states it's great to have you with us today. >> good to be with you too, jenna. jenna: what information you have about the bombing? >> we don't know who is responsible yet, but we do know that hamas is celebrating. giving out candy to children, you can go on youtube and see that hamas supporters saying that they want more israeli body bags. it is about genocidal groups in gaza trying to kill the maximum number of israelis, while we are trying to defend ourselves and reduce the palestinian civilian casualties to the greatest extent that we can. the terrorists are digging in behind us million population. jenna: how has the cease fire talks been going? >> they have not been going well. they are discussing a long-term arrangement to put in a mechanism that prevent hamas from shooting at our population and paralyzing half the country. also stopping iran from smuggling long-range missiles into
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
for the israeli people. the israelis and jihad and other organizations, egypt is being held responsible by the united states and the entire world for the rockets coming out of the gaza strip, if there are any. another point to make is that there is going to be a cessation attempts to stop the weapons smuggling that is coming from egypt into the gaza strip. if you look at this live, there is a faint glow and rocket interceptor that went out. the school has now burned out. but we are not at the point of the cease-fire agreement as of yet. that will come in about 58 minutes. you just heard the boom from the rocket interception overhead of the gaza strip. here is what to look for in the next 50 minutes. there is going to be heavy fire, as we traditionally see, where everyone lights off as many rounds as they can. israel has been hitting a lot of targets behind me in the gaza strip and going forward, there will be 12 or 24 hours for it to take effect. it takes a while for everyone to get the memo to stop firing. this is a big moment for mohammed morsi. a couple of years ago he was part of th
time. >> egypt's government is assuming the responsibility and leadership. >> they would not be allowing it unless prime minister netanyahu signed off on this. >> michael: you know, we will have that, we'll examine the role president obama played in that today. should this turkey be safe? >> i don't think it will change me at pull. the same values and convictions and same policies. sarah palin is just one of our turkeys. we'll have a lot of fun. it's gobel, gobel time. >> michael: big story around the country is the fact that walmart wanted to open their stores at 8:00 thanksgiving tomorrow, and the workers are fed up with it. here is a little bit of a story about that. >> workers at 1,000 walmart stores are planning to walk off the job upset that they have to work on thanksgiving. the stores slated to open 8:00 p.m. >> we're just demanding respect. >> michael: you know that's from "abc news" joined again today luckily tricia rose professor at brown university, and michael hastings buzzfeed, rolling stone, and probably going to write another book. >> the book is going t
at the presidential palace in egypt who assured me there was no announcement yet to be made from the presidential palace regarding a truce agreement. he gave me a simple explanation. the president's sister passed away in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a ve
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
by egypt, turkey and qatari officials. israeli defense forces targeted a media building in gaza, aiming at four senior hamas operatives they believed were inside. and two people died. it is not clear if they were the ones designated as the hamas targets. hamas, which grew out of the muslim brotherhood, seized in our gaza in 2007. since then, the group has become increasingly militarized. the death toll stands at 100 in gaza including women and children. and three in israel. any others have been wounded on both sides. israel credits its anti-missional defense system known as the iron dome funded by the united states for its low number of deaths. cnn's frederick platkin was live when the system intercepted a rocket midair. >> there, over in the sky, you probably won't be able to see it here, there is an interceptor missile taking off now. that's the iron dome interceptor. if you saw the flash in the sky, that was a rocket coming out of gaudia that was just intercepted right now. >> despite back and forth rocket and missile launches, there is a behind the scenes optimism that a cease-fire
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: egypt's leaders tried today to mediate a truce between israel and hamas, but there was no outward sign of progress. instead, the two sides traded hundreds more air strikes and rocket attacks. in gaza, palestinians reported more than 100 people killed so far, more than half of them civilians. we have two reports from independent television news, beginning with john ray in gaza. (gunfire). >> reporter: two sides talking peace but conducting a war. fairly a lull in hostilities before an israeli air strike killed another militant leader inside a building used by local and world media. this was already the day of the dead when bodies followed bodies from morgue to cemetery shrouded in the green flag of hamas and carried along on a seething river of fury. no surrender, this man shouts. it's either us or israel in this land. these are the dead from one family: four children who died with their father and mother, their aunts and their sisters. the house where they lived and perished in an instant has been wiped from the earth, whether thi
, they find egypt, turkey and other countries of the region are playing a much more proactive role in this crisis. >> fuad joining us in new york. fuad, hillary clinton is going to be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah, in the west bank. there's a lot of observers saying that's sort of a face-saving move, trying to help him out, he's sort of been sidelined in all of this. who comes out of this among the palestinian group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens and what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with palestinian groups? the u.s. does not recognize hamas, it's been trying to deal with the palestinian authority but if mahmoud abbas has lost power through all this, what does that mean moving forward to where getting some longer term peace deal? >> to be honest with you, anderson, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead. i think the palestinian people have known now six decades of futility, if you will. they have never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own life. they have
a role did she play and how big a role was this for the new government of egypt in fashioning this truce? >> reporter: well, any time a secretary of state travels, it's really important. and she was there for the closing. but all the american officials have said, this was egypt's proposal. america spoke to hamas through egypt. israel spoke to hamas through egypt. and president obama in his statement after the cease-fire said that he had urged the israeli prime minister to accept egypt's proposal. they definitely played the major role here in getting hamas to the table. i had an exclusive interview with the head of hamas, he said what they want out of it is a lifting of the siege. that may happen. what israel wants out of it is no more rockets into israel and no more supply of weapons to gaza. they might get that, as well. but of course, we're going to watch. it's fragile. >> and christiane, you heard the word the white house used today, tenuous, late this afternoon. what is your sense on the ground about how strong the truce is? >> reporter: well, it's really early days. it went into eff
the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of "the new york times" and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the fallout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes, as well since the killing of ahmed al jabarry, who is the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we've just heard this from its military spokesperson, that they are bringing in reservists, but they are considering a ground war, but have not yet given the go-ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from the sea. their ships are anchored just off of the sea there in ga
's a bit of hope for a negotiated cease-fire. leaders from egypt and france are trying to mediate. for the past five days israel and hamas have fired rockets and bombed one another, israeli air strikes have taken a heavy toll on gaza and hamas. right now israel is keeping open the possibility of a ground offensive. they've got 30,000 troopons the border with another 75,000 reservists being called up. now, i want to show you something that played out live on israeli television just a short time ago. watch this. what you're called is called an iron dome. this is egypt's defensive zone system. they're tracking down two rockets. at the end, the small puffs there, that's the signals of success that those intercepters headed off those rockets. so far israel says a thousand rockets have been fired. hamas puts it at about 900. the constant threat has those in israel in fear. >> reporter: there's another attack, another rocket alert going on. we've got to get out of here. >> go, fred. there you see it. a strike in ash colon. we've got the pictures up as fred and our camera crew get out of
between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a ground invasion of gaza at a later date, but agreeing to a ceasefire made sense now. >> i know there are
, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentati
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
that the spring is beneficial, we see that in egypt, this is not necessarily the case. the muslim brotherhood in egypt, the sunni islam that party with different views of regional policy. the egyptian president was in tehran recently for the non-aligned movement meeting and there is a lot of worry at him going to tehran would indicate that iran was isolated as the u.s. had imagined it to be or wanted it to be. more see meeting with iran officials indicated iran is an important regional player. of course what did morrissey during undreamed due? he criticized the regime of bashar al-assad and implicitly criticized the regime for his support of syria. this was an embarrassment for the iranian leadership, to the point that they change translation on television. he criticized syria and every man television set by rain. so trying to save face basically. but we've seen that egypt is not necessarily going to follow iran's policies in the region. in fact, the egyptians have kept their distance from tehran. they have not resumed relations in this a lot of tension in some issues. in addition, turkey eme
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
but so far it's still holding. a top leader of egypt's muslim brotherhood is calling for a holy war. he urged muslims to back the palestinians. his statement contradicts morsi's who helped broker that cease-fire. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest this morning. good morning. >> reporter: talking about jihad being obligatory for muslims, an example of the conflicting messages that regularly come out of the brotherhood but for now the 24 hour cooling off period has passed and this uneasy peace is holding. two border crossings between gaza and egypt are open again. palestinians forced to remain in gaza when the fighting broke out can return to jobs and families abroad. travel restrictions into israel are also expected to ease. this man says thank god for the first time we have victory and we make the rules. but the israelis are also claiming victory. following the deadly eight day conflict with hamas. hamas promised it would stop firing rockets into israel, saving israel from having to launch a ground war. one israeli commander warns, though, his troops will be ready if needed
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to pick up as the day goes on, but some of the things that are working in new york's favor, the weath
parties brokered by the united states and egypt. however, you saw the exiled leader of hamas say that as long as egypt abides by this agreement, we will, too. but if they don't, our finger is on the trigger, and you have seen palestinian terrorists in the past defy agreements like this. so it is very fragile at this point. >> one of those splinter groups. and listen, even hillary clinton has cautioned this is not over yet. let's listen. >> every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace for all the people of the region. there is no substitute for a just and lasting peace. >> jonathan, do you think the president's going to make a long-term peaceful resolution part of his second term goals? >> well, you know, he may try to do that. i tend to be a pessimist. but that's likely to happen. having seen so many failed attempts in the past. one of the really interesting things about this is, of course, the agreement is tenuous, but there's also a lot of talk from experts about the role of iran, in potentially supplying the rockets to hamas. and that could play an interesting role in
is involved in the ongoing summit. she plans to visit israel and ramallah and egypt because u.s. considers hamas a terrorist consideration and prohibits contact it is relying on egypt and turk yeqatar to deliver its message to the hamas leadership. >> on the trip secretary clinton will emphasize the united states interest in a peaceful out come that protects and enhances israel's security and outcome to lead to improved relations to the civilians in gaza and reopen the path for israelies and palestinians so they can live in peace and security. >> some doubt secretary clinton's visit will have affect. egyptian president morsi has meet with hamas in a show of solidarity. >> brian: until there is a cease fire israeli citizens living in constant fear despite the success of the iron dome. leland has witnessed a lot of them and live on the israeli and gaza border with more. what about today? >> indeed busy again. at least 30 rockets fired in this direction out of the gaza toward the town of beersheba and destroyed a house and a bus. we hear the laleral f-16 that is bombing the gasa strip. day 7.
to tel aviv. those were iranian-made missiles, and a big part of the ceasefire was pressure put on egypt to stop the smuggling tunnels. the question is whether iran will continue to keep smuggling weapons in, that's most likely a yes. number three, will the egyptians stop it, and number three, will islamic jihad listen to hamas and stop the rocket fire or will they continue to cause problems here for israel. back to you. gregg: leland vittert, thanks very much. so will the ceasefire hold? what does this mean for hillary clinton and her shuttle diplomacy? general jack keane advised hillary clinton for many, many years, he will join us in just a couple of minutes. >> meanwhile, a trio of u.s. warships sent to the eastern mediterranean area just in case americans need to be evacuated out of israel. the ships were due to return to norfolk, virginia, but their homecoming will be a bit delayed by at least several days. reports say these ships would not play a combat role and would only be used to help americans in that area. they can also serve as floating hospitals if need be. >>> susan rice
are coming up through egypt into the gaza strip. there is a report that came out over the weekend. we'll take it one more step. the issue of iran over here to the east. the reports that iran are shipping weapons and rockets into sudan and truck north into egypt and into the gaza strip. if that's the argument you are making how do you stop this once and for all. >> our problem is not our border gaza but other country's borders with gaza. among the rockets being fired at us come directly from iran. hama terrorists have trained with the iranians. there is a strong connection. i can't see your map. gaza looks like a small place. but this is no more a struggle between small israel and small gaza and the cuba missile crisis was a struggle between the u.s. and cuba. all these groups to one degree or another are supplied and funded by the terrible regime in iran. bill: we come back to the basic question, that's what the world is waiting to know. will there be an invasion of gaza or not? >> we have to keep that option open. when you have half of your population in bomb shelters or a 15-second run to t
minute. egypt's foreign minister alongside the secretary of state hillary clinton announcing a cease-fire between israel and gaza. ending a more than a week long conflict. he brokered a deal set to take effect at 8:00 p.m. israel time, 2:00 p.m. eastern. this resulted in a centur ceasee and resume calm. saying egypt is resuming its possibly of leadership that has long made it a cornerstone of regional stability. president obama: israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier expressing his appreciation to seek a more advisable solution. especially in matters of weapons smuggling into gaza. i minister at yahoo express his appreciation for the support and assistance to the iran dome system. that is least for now, now i will take you back to melissa. melissa: thank you so much. it is expected to be a mad dash at stores all over tomorrow night. with some retailers open earlier than ever before. the tradition could be on its way out. our next guest says online shopping is lessen the significance of like friday deals. joining us is paypal shopping specialist. it does really feel like t
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